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Senior Correspondent

What Bad Habits Do You Bring to the Table?

What Bad Habits Do You Bring to the Table?

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The rush to get things done is one reason why the way things get done frustrates you. You didn’t get up this morning with aspirations of coming home discouraged. 

Bad habits are never intentional. You’re doing so much that you don’t take time to improve the way you do things.

Reasons bad habits take hold:

  1. Time constraints are an excuse for neglect. People in a hurry don’t have time to care for others or improve processes.
  2. A daily crisis is an excuse for bad habits. You look around one day and wonder how things got this way.
  3. Problems seem to give purpose to your existence. In the process of focusing on problems, environments go dark and teams grow discouraged.

Meetings are a process that fall victim to the problem of being too busy to make improvements. Saying, “let’s hurry up and get this meeting over,” means the process needs improvement. You’re so busy running meetings that you don’t take time to improve your meetings. Try spending five minutes at the beginning or end of your meetings to improve the process. Choose one category and one discussion point from the following list.

Discussion points that humanize meetings:

  1. Who in our organization is making unnoticed contributions?
  2. How do we want to treat each other in this meeting?
  3. What would you like to focus on, if you had more time?
  4. Who are we serving?

Discussion points that improve the process:

  1. What will make this a great meeting?
  2. What makes this meeting matter?
  3. What happened at the best meeting you ever attended? What didn’t happen?
  4. What issues seem to take too much time? How might we remedy that?
  5. What five behaviors might make our meetings better?

Discussion points at the end of meetings:

  1. What worked for you in this meeting?
  2. How could we make our next meeting even better?
  3. Which discussion points have the most potential to improve our meetings?
  4. What discussion points to improve meetings would you add?

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